Government Contracts & Investigations

First COVID-19 Fraud Action Filed by the DOJ, and What It Means for Government Contractors

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The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) announced it has taken its first action in federal court to combat fraud related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The heightened fraud enforcement establishes a new precedent for government contractors, in particular, to take extra steps to ensure robust compliance measures are in place, to review supply chain agreements,Read More

Topics: Contract Administration, Fraud, False Claims, and False Statements

You Can’t Always Get What You Want…Unless You Actually Asked For It

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The Government was recently reminded of its responsibility to clearly articulate its requirements for contract performance in Command Language, Inc. d/b/a CLI Solutions, ASBCA No. 61216. There, the Government had sought the creation of 30 and 40 level maintenance manuals to support Afghan forces utilizing Mobile Strike Force Vehicles (MSFV) in Afghanistan. The Afghan forcesRead More

Topics: Claims and Disputes

Force Majeure and the Coronavirus (COVID-19)

Generally speaking, entities that enter into contracts are bound to perform them. However, as matters evolve, the impacts of natural and man-made problems arising from the coronavirus (COVID-19) are being felt by customers, their contractors, and suppliers. Who bears the costs of such impacts and are there possible defenses or routes to recovery of costs?Read More

Topics: Supply Chain Risk Management

The Impact of the Coronavirus on the Global Supply Chain

At the end of December, China acknowledged the existence of the coronavirus, and this burgeoning heath crisis is becoming a supply chain problem. China, a major manufacturing hub for materials, products and components being used around the world, has been significantly impacted.  Facing the fast spread of the virus, China took a number of steps–delaying theRead More

Topics: Supply Chain Risk Management

Everybody’s Crying National Security, Just as Long as There’s Business First

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The title of this article is based on a line in an old song, “Everybody’s Crying Mercy,” by Mose Allison. As modified, the couplet captures the cognitive dissonance that many are feeling as a result of the federal government’s conflicting approach to trade with Huawei Technologies Co. Ltd. (Huawei) and its non-United States affiliates. InRead More

Topics: Export Controls, Sanctions and CFIUS